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        • KCI등재후보

          Effects of Size and Rate of Maturing on Carcass Composition of Pasture- or Feedlot- Developed Steers

          A. H. Brown, Jr.,P. K. Camfield,R. T. Baublits,F. W. Pohlman,Z. B. Johnson,C. J. Brown,G. T. Tabler, Jr.,B. A. Sandelin 아세아·태평양축산학회 2006 Animal Bioscience Vol.19 No.5

          Steers (n = 335) of known genetic backgrounds from four fundamentally different growth types were subjected to two production systems to study the main effects and possible interactive effects on carcass composition. Growth types were animals with genetic potential for large mature weight (LL), intermediate mature weight-late maturing (IL), intermediate mature weight-early maturing (IE), and small mature weight-early maturing (SE). Each year, in a nine year study, calves of each growth type were weaned and five steers of each growth type were developed on pasture or feedlot and harvested at approximately 20 and 14 mo of age, respectively. Data recorded were chilled carcass weight and percentages of forequarter, foreshank, chuck, rib, plate, brisket, hindquarter, round, rump, shortloin, sirloin, flank, lean, fat, bone, and retail cuts. The growth type×production system interaction was an important source of variation in chilled carcass weight (p = 0.0395) and percentage retail cuts (p = 0.001), lean (p = 0.001), fat (p = 0.001), rump (p = 0.0454), shortloin (p = 0.0487), and flank (p = 0.001). The ranking of the growth type x production system means for percentage lean was LL-pasture>IL-pasture = IE-pasture = SE-pasture>LL-feedlot, IL-feedlot>IE-feedlot = SE-feedlot. The growth type× production system interaction was non-significant (p>0.05) for forequarter, foreshank, chuck, rib, plate, brisket, hindquarter, round and bone. Growth types of IE and SE yielded greater (p<0.05) mean forequarter than did growth types of IL and LL (51.6±0.3 and 51.5±0.3 vs. 51.1±0.3 and 50.8±0.3%). Mean bone was highest (p<0.05) for the LL growth type and lowest (p<0.05) for the SE growth type (19.5±0.5 vs. 16.8±0.5%). Mean bone was greater (p<0.05) for the pastured steers than for the feedlot steers (21.8±0.8 vs. 14.5±0.6%). These data indicate that growth type responded differently in the two production systems and that these results should be helpful in the match of genetics to production resources. Steers (n = 335) of known genetic backgrounds from four fundamentally different growth types were subjected to two production systems to study the main effects and possible interactive effects on carcass composition. Growth types were animals with genetic potential for large mature weight (LL), intermediate mature weight-late maturing (IL), intermediate mature weight-early maturing (IE), and small mature weight-early maturing (SE). Each year, in a nine year study, calves of each growth type were weaned and five steers of each growth type were developed on pasture or feedlot and harvested at approximately 20 and 14 mo of age, respectively. Data recorded were chilled carcass weight and percentages of forequarter, foreshank, chuck, rib, plate, brisket, hindquarter, round, rump, shortloin, sirloin, flank, lean, fat, bone, and retail cuts. The growth type×production system interaction was an important source of variation in chilled carcass weight (p = 0.0395) and percentage retail cuts (p = 0.001), lean (p = 0.001), fat (p = 0.001), rump (p = 0.0454), shortloin (p = 0.0487), and flank (p = 0.001). The ranking of the growth type x production system means for percentage lean was LL-pasture>IL-pasture = IE-pasture = SE-pasture>LL-feedlot, IL-feedlot>IE-feedlot = SE-feedlot. The growth type× production system interaction was non-significant (p>0.05) for forequarter, foreshank, chuck, rib, plate, brisket, hindquarter, round and bone. Growth types of IE and SE yielded greater (p<0.05) mean forequarter than did growth types of IL and LL (51.6±0.3 and 51.5±0.3 vs. 51.1±0.3 and 50.8±0.3%). Mean bone was highest (p<0.05) for the LL growth type and lowest (p<0.05) for the SE growth type (19.5±0.5 vs. 16.8±0.5%). Mean bone was greater (p<0.05) for the pastured steers than for the feedlot steers (21.8±0.8 vs. 14.5±0.6%). These data indicate that growth type responded differently in the two production systems and that these results should be helpful in the match of genetics to production resources.

        • SCIESCOPUSKCI등재

          Effect of Beef Growth Type on Cooking Loss, Tenderness, and Chemical Composition of Pasture- or Feedlot-developed Steers

          Brown, A.H.,Camfield, P.K.,Rowe, C.W.,Rakes, L.Y.,Pohlman, F.W.,Johnson, Z.B.,Tabler, G.T.,Sandelin, B.A. Asian Australasian Association of Animal Productio 2007 Animal Bioscience Vol.20 No.11

          Steers (n = 335) of known genetic background from four fundamentally different growth types were subjected to two production systems to study differences in cooking loss (CL), tenderness, and chemical composition. Growth types were animals with genetic potential for large mature weight-late maturing (LL), intermediate mature weight-late maturing (IL), intermediate mature weight -early maturing (IE), and small mature weight-early maturing (SE). Each year, in a nine-year study, calves of each growth type were weaned and five steers of each growth type were developed on pasture or feedlot and harvested at approximately 20 and 14 mo of age, respectively. Data collected were CL and Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBS) for the Longissimus dorsi (LM), Psoas major (PS), and Quadriceps femoris (QF) muscles. Chemical composition was also determined from the right fore- and hindquarter. Data were analyzed using least squares analysis of variance for unequal subclass numbers. The beef growth $type{\times}production$ system interaction was significant for CL and WBS of the LM and ash in the lean trim of the forequarter. Growth types of LL and IL had greater (p<0.05) mean percentage CL in the PS and QF muscles than did IE and SE steers. Growth type LL had the highest (p<0.05) mean for both moisture and protein in the fore- and hindquarters; while SE had the lowest numerical mean value for moisture and protein in the fore- and hindquarters. Shear force of the PS did not differ (p>0.05) among steers of the four growth types. Increasing challenges to the cattle feeding industry may dictate that pasture development play a larger role in future production regimes. Producers should strive to match genetic growth type with available resources in order to remain viable and continue producing a quality product.

        • SCIESCOPUSKCI등재

          Effects of Size and Rate of Maturing on Carcass Composition of Pasture- or Feedlot- Developed Steers

          Brown, A.H. Jr.,Camfield, P.K.,Baublits, R.T.,Pohlman, F.W.,Johnson, Z.B.,Brown, C.J.,Tabler, G.T.,Sandelin, B.A. Asian Australasian Association of Animal Productio 2006 Animal Bioscience Vol.19 No.5

          Steers (n = 335) of known genetic backgrounds from four fundamentally different growth types were subjected to two production systems to study the main effects and possible interactive effects on carcass composition. Growth types were animals with genetic potential for large mature weight (LL), intermediate mature weight-late maturing (IL), intermediate mature weight-early maturing (IE), and small mature weight-early maturing (SE). Each year, in a nine year study, calves of each growth type were weaned and five steers of each growth type were developed on pasture or feedlot and harvested at approximately 20 and 14 mo of age, respectively. Data recorded were chilled carcass weight and percentages of forequarter, foreshank, chuck, rib, plate, brisket, hindquarter, round, rump, shortloin, sirloin, flank, lean, fat, bone, and retail cuts. The growth $type{\times}production$ system interaction was an important source of variation in chilled carcass weight (p = 0.0395) and percentage retail cuts (p = 0.001), lean (p = 0.001), fat (p = 0.001), rump (p = 0.0454), shortloin (p = 0.0487), and flank (p = 0.001). The ranking of the growth $type{\times}production$ system means for percentage lean was LL-pasture>IL-pasture = IE-pasture = SE-pasture>LL-feedlot, IL-feedlot>IE-feedlot = SE-feedlot. The growth $type{\times}production$ system interaction was non-significant (p>0.05) for forequarter, foreshank, chuck, rib, plate, brisket, hindquarter, round and bone. Growth types of IE and SE yielded greater (p<0.05) mean forequarter than did growth types of IL and LL ($51.6{\pm}0.3$ and $51.5{\pm}0.3$ vs. $51.1{\pm}0.3$ and $50.8{\pm}0.3%$). Mean bone was highest (p<0.05) for the LL growth type and lowest (p<0.05) for the SE growth type ($19.5{\pm}0.5$ vs. $16.8{\pm}0.5%$). Mean bone was greater (p<0.05) for the pastured steers than for the feedlot steers ($21.8{\pm}0.8$ vs. $14.5{\pm}0.6%$). These data indicate that growth type responded differently in the two production systems and that these results should be helpful in the match of genetics to production resources.

        • SCIESCOPUSKCI등재

          Interaction of Beef Growth Type${\times}$Production System for Carcass Traits of Steers

          Brown , A.H. Jr.,Camfield, P.K.,Johnson, Z.B.,Rakes, L.Y.,Pohlman, F.W.,Brown, C.J.,Sandelin, B.A.,Baublits, R.T. Asian Australasian Association of Animal Productio 2005 Animal Bioscience Vol.18 No.2

          Steers (n=335) of known genetic backgrounds from four fundamentally different growth types were subjected to two production systems to study differences in carcass traits. Growth types were animals with genetic potential for large mature weight-late maturing, intermediate mature weight-late maturing, intermediate mature weight-early maturing and small mature weight-early maturing. Each year, in a nine-year study, calves of each growth type were weaned and five steers of each growth type were developed on pasture or feedlot and slaughtered at approximately 20 and 14 months of age, respectively. Data collected were pre-slaughter shrunk body weight (SBW); hot carcass weight (HCW); dressing percentage (DRESS); fat thickness at the $12^{th}$ and $13^{th}$ rib interface (FAT); percentage kidney, pelvic, and heart fat (KPH); longissimus muscle area (LMA); marbling score (MARB); quality grade (QG); and yield grade (YG). Year and growth type were significant for all carcass traits. The growth type${\times}$production system interaction was an important source of variation in SBW, HCW; FAT, YG and MARB. The same interaction was non-significant for DRESS, KPH, LMA and QG. Carcass differences in measures of fatness were greater in the feedlot system than in the pasture system. These data could aid producers in matching beef growth type to the production system most suitable for efficient use of resources.

        • KCI등재후보

          Interaction of Beef Growth Type?Production System for Carcass Traits of Steers

          A. H. Brown, Jr.,P. K. Camfield,Z. B. Johnson,L. Y. Rakes,F. W. Pohlman,C. J. Brown,B. A. Sandelin,R. T. Baublits 아세아·태평양축산학회 2005 Animal Bioscience Vol.18 No.2

          Steers (n=335) of known genetic backgrounds from four fundamentally different growth types were subjected to two production systems to study differences in carcass traits. Growth types were animals with genetic potential for large mature weight-late maturing, intermediate mature weight-late maturing, intermediate mature weight-early maturing and small mature weight-early maturing. Each year, in a nine-year study, calves of each growth type were weaned and five steers of each growth type were developed on pasture or feedlot and slaughtered at approximately 20 and 14 months of age, respectively. Data collected were pre-slaughter shrunk body weight (SBW); hot carcass weight (HCW); dressing percentage (DRESS); fat thickness at the 12th and 13th rib interface (FAT); percentage kidney, pelvic, and heart fat (KPH); longissimus muscle area (LMA); marbling score (MARB); quality grade (QG); and yield grade (YG). Year and growth type were significant for all carcass traits. The growth typeproduction system interaction was an important source of variation in SBW, HCW; FAT, YG and MARB. The same interaction was non-significant for DRESS, KPH, LMA and QG. Carcass differences in measures of fatness were greater in the feedlot system than in the pasture system. These data could aid producers in matching beef growth type to the production system most suitable for efficient use of resources.

        • KCI등재후보

          Effect of Beef Growth Type on Cooking Loss, Tenderness, and Chemical Composition of Pasture- or Feedlot-developed Steers

          A.H. Brown, Jr.,P.K. Camfield,C.W. Rowe,L.Y. Rakes,F.W. Pohlman,Z.B. Johnson,G.T. Tabler,B.A. Sandelin 아세아·태평양축산학회 2007 Animal Bioscience Vol.20 No.11

          Steers (n = 335) of known genetic background from four fundamentally different growth types were subjected to two production systems to study differences in cooking loss (CL), tenderness, and chemical composition. Growth types were animals with genetic potential for large mature weight-late maturing (LL), intermediate mature weight-late maturing (IL), intermediate mature weight -early maturing (IE), and small mature weight-early maturing (SE). Each year, in a nine-year study, calves of each growth type were weaned and five steers of each growth type were developed on pasture or feedlot and harvested at approximately 20 and 14 mo of age, respectively. Data collected were CL and Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBS) for the Longissimus dorsi (LM), Psoas major (PS), and Quadriceps femoris (QF) muscles. Chemical composition was also determined from the right fore??and hindquarter. Data were analyzed using least squares analysis of variance for unequal subclass numbers. The beef growth type??production system interaction was significant for CL and WBS of the LM and ash in the lean trim of the forequarter. Growth types of LL and IL had greater (p<0.05) mean percentage CL in the PS and QF muscles than did IE and SE steers. Growth type LL had the highest (p<0.05) mean for both moisture and protein in the fore- and hindquarters; while SE had the lowest numerical mean value for moisture and protein in the fore- and hindquarters. Shear force of the PS did not differ (p>0.05) among steers of the four growth types. Increasing challenges to the cattle feeding industry may dictate that pasture development play a larger role in future production regimes. Producers should strive to match genetic growth type with available resources in order to remain viable and continue producing a quality product.

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