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      • The Effects of Touch Button Size to the Operability of Touchscreen

        Jinghong,Xiong,Satoshi,Muraki,Kiyotaka,Fukumoto 대한인간공학회 2014 대한인간공학회 학술대회논문집 Vol.2014 No.5

        The present study investigated the influence of button size on the operability of a touch panel screen and compared this influence between young adults and the elderly. Twenty-one young adults (age: 22.3±1.5 years) and twenty elderly people (age: 68.1±4.9 years) operated the interface of a touch panel screen with their right index finger. It displayed 0-9 numeric square buttons at 6 different size conditions (6, 8, 10, 12, 14 and 16 mm). Smaller buttons at and below 10 mm increased the operation time and error rate, and decreased the subjective overall operability. The influence of button size was greater in the elderly than in the young adults. The reaction positions were located to the right of the center of the button, which made the reaction position approach the right outline of the button, especially for smaller buttons. These results suggest that smaller buttons should be avoided in interfaces on touch panel screens, especially those used by the elderly.

      • The Effects of Touch Button Size to the Operability of Touchscreen

        ( Jinghong Xiong ), ( Satoshi Muraki ), ( Kiyotaka Fukumoto ) 한국감성과학회 2014 춘계학술대회 Vol.2014 No.-

        The present study investigated the influence of button size on the operability of a touch panel screen and compared this influence between young adults and the elderly. Twenty-one young adults (age: 22.3±1.5 years) and twenty elderly people (age: 68.1±4.9 years) operated the interface of a touch panel screen with their right index finger. It displayed 0-9 numeric square buttons at 6 different size conditions (6, 8, 10, 12, 14 and 16 mm). Smaller buttons at and below 10 mm increased the operation time and error rate, and decreased the subjective overall operability. The influence of button size was greater in the elderly than in the young adults. The reaction positions were located to the right of the center of the button, which made the reaction position approach the right outline of the button, especially for smaller buttons. These results suggest that smaller buttons should be avoided in interfaces on touch panel screens, especially those used by the elderly.

      • Deformation of Median Nerve during Active and Passive Wrist Holding at Proximal Carpal Tunnel

        Ping,Yeap,LOH,Satoshi,MURAKI 대한인간공학회 2014 대한인간공학회 학술대회논문집 Vol.2014 No.5

        The first objective of this study was to identify the deformation of the median nerve cross-sectional area (MNCSA) at different wrist active and passive holding positions. The second objective was to compare the wrist circumference, wrist width, and wrist depth between dominant and non-dominant hands. A total of eight right-handed healthy male adults (age 27.0 ± 3.5 years) participated in this study. Ultrasound examination was performed at the proximal carpal tunnel to examine the median nerve on the transverse plane. A total of three wrist positions were examined, namely, wrist neutral, wrist flexion 30°, and wrist extension 30°, in active and passive holding positions for both dominant and non-dominant hands. Paired t-test showed significant differences between dominant (D) and non-dominant (ND) hands in wrist circumference (D = 15.9 ± 0.6 cm, ND = 15.7 ± 0.6 cm, p<0.05), wrist width (D = 56.3 ± 3.6 mm, ND = 54.0 ± 2.1 mm, p<0.05), and wrist depth (D = 39.6 ± 2.8 mm, ND = 38.3 ± 2.7 mm, p<0.01). The differences of MNCSA between dominant and non-dominant hands were significant (p<0.001) at both active (D = 7.93 ± 0.63 mm<SUP>2</SUP>, ND = 6.98 ± 0.42 mm<SUP>2</SUP>) and passive holding positions (D = 8.22 ± 0.72 mm<SUP>2</SUP>, ND = 7.06 ± 0.44 mm<SUP>2</SUP>). Two-way repeated-measures ANOVA showed that wrist flexion 30° and wrist extension 30° caused significant reductions in MNCSA when compared with wrist neutral (p<0.001) in both active and passive holding positions. However, wrist active and passive holding did not have a significant effect on MNCSA changes. In conclusion, our findings showed that significant reduction of MNCSA was associated with wrist flexion-extension motion and there was significant bilateral asymmetry in physical characteristics of the wrist.

      • Deformation of Median Nerve during Active and Passive Wrist Holding at Proximal Carpal Tunnel

        ( Ping Yeap Loh ), ( Satoshi Muraki ) 한국감성과학회 2014 춘계학술대회 Vol.2014 No.-

        The first objective of this study was to identify the deformation of the median nerve cross-sectional area (MNCSA) at different wrist active and passive holding positions. The second objective was to compare the wrist circumference, wrist width, and wrist depth between dominant and non-dominant hands. A total of eight right-handed healthy male adults (age 27.0 ±3.5 years) participated in this study. Ultrasound examination was performed at the proximal carpal tunnel to examine the median nerve on the transverse plane. A total of three wrist positions were examined, namely, wrist neutral, wrist flexion 30°, and wrist extension 30°, in active and passive holding positions for both dominant and non-dominant hands. Paired t-test showed significant differences between dominant (D) and non-dominant (ND) hands in wrist circumference, wrist width, and wrist depth (D = 39.6 ± 2.8 mm, ND = 38.3 ± 2.7 mm, p<0.01). The differences of MNCSA between dominant and non-dominant hands were significant (p<0.001) at both active (D = 7.93 ± 0.63 mm2, ND = 6.98 ± 0.42 mm2) and passive holding positions (D = 8.22 ± 0.72 mm2, ND = 7.06 ± 0.44 mm2). Two-way repeated-measures ANOVA showed that wrist flexion 30° and wrist extension 30°caused significant reductions in MNCSA when compared with wrist neutral (p<0.001) in both active and passive holding positions.

      • The Observation of Children`s Holding Position to Redesign Elementary School Chair for Easy Carrying and Moving

        ( Lu`lu` Purwaningrum ), ( Satoshi Muraki ) 한국감성과학회 2014 춘계학술대회 Vol.2014 No.-

        Objectives. Carrying and moving chairs enable and improve learning activities at school, which leads to better quality of education. At elementary schools in Indonesia and other developing countries, only one size of chair has been used for all ages and grades, therefore, making it heavy for younger children. The objective of the present study was to observe the motion of carrying and moving an elementary school chair by children. Methods. A total of 41 children consisting of 16 Indonesian and 25 Japanese children (17 boys and 24 girls) aged 6, 7, 8 and 9 participated in this study. We used three elementary school chairs (1 Indonesian and 2 Japanese chairs). The participants carried and moved the chairs 3 m with an ordinary speed, and were allowed to hold any part of the chair that was convenient for them. We recorded their motion when carrying and moving the chair. Results. The chair was carried at the side or in front of the child`s body, and the chair being in a lateral position is the most popular method of carrying and moving (75%).

      • The observation of children`s holding position to redesign elementary school chair for easy carrying and moving

        Lu'lu',Purwaningrum,Satoshi,Muraki 대한인간공학회 2014 대한인간공학회 학술대회논문집 Vol.2014 No.5

        Objectives. Carrying and moving chairs enable and improve learning activities at school, which leads to better quality of education. At elementary schools in Indonesia and other developing countries, only one size of chair has been used for all ages and grades, therefore, making it heavy for younger children. The objective of the present study was to observe the motion of carrying and moving an elementary school chair by children. Methods. A total of 41 children consisting of 16 Indonesian and 25 Japanese children (17 boys and 24 girls) aged 6, 7, 8 and 9 participated in this study. We used three elementary school chairs (1 Indonesian and 2 Japanese chairs). The participants carried and moved the chairs 3 m with an ordinary speed, and were allowed to hold any part of the chair that was convenient for them. We recorded their motion when carrying and moving the chair. Results. The chair was carried at the side or in front of the child's body, and the chair being in a lateral position is the most popular method of carrying and moving (75%). In all methods, participants showed a preference in using two particular chair parts to hold the chair. Conclusions. Careful consideration is needed on the design of elementary school chairs from the perspective of the main methods and holding pattern for carrying and moving them, especially heavy chairs that are used in elementary schools in Indonesia.

      • Age-Related Changes in Walking Motion of Japanese Females: Basic Analysis of Gait Motion

        ( Irma Nur Afiah ), ( Hiroki Nakashima ), ( Satoshi Muraki ) 한국감성과학회 2014 춘계학술대회 Vol.2014 No.-

        The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of aging on gait parameters at two different speed conditions in Japanese females. This study involved 42 healthy Japanese females who were divided into three groups: (1) 14 younger females, mean age 22.3 ± 1.6 years, (2) 14 older females (65 to 75 years old), mean age 70.7 ± 1.8 years, and (3) 14 very old females (≥ 76 years old), mean age 78.2 ± 3.5 years. Various parameters were measured: basic gait parameters (speed of walking, right step length, left step length, step length, difference between right and left step lengths, ratio of step length to height, ratio of step length to lower-limb length, and cadence) and gait cycle parameters (time of swing phase, time of stance phase, time of one gait cycle, percentage of swing phase, and percentage of stance phase). The walking speeds in groups 1, 2, and 3 were 72 ± 5.4, 71.4 ± 7.3, and 69.7 ± 6.7 at the self-selected speed, and 91.3 ± 7.4, 86.2 ± 8.3, and 85.1 ± 9.1 m/min at the fast speed, respectively.

      • KCI등재

        Exploratory Study on the Impacts of Handle Vibration on the Hand and Forearm

        Josefa,Angelie,Revilla,Ping,Yeap,Loh,Satoshi,Muraki 대한산업공학회 2019 Industrial Engineeering & Management Systems Vol.18 No.4

        This study investigated the immediate impacts of short-term handle vibration on hand functions, upper limb discomfort, and forearm muscle responses during hand grip test and task performance of seven healthy young adults. Thetask was to grip the handlebar for 5 minutes with 50% perceived strength under two conditions: with handle vibration(HV) and without handle vibration (NHV). Activities of forearm muscles namely flexor carpi radialis (FCR), flexor ofthe fingers (FF), flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU), and extensor digitorum (ED) were recorded using surface electromyography (EMG), while post-task hand tests for finger dexterity, strength, and sensibility were also measured. These fingerfunctions as well as muscle responses did not differ significantly between HV and NHV. The lacking effects might beassociated to the inconsistencies on grip force during task, perhaps participants let go of the handle during the latterpart. Meanwhile, perceived discomfort on the shoulder was significantly higher after HV than NHV and activity ofFCR, FF, and ED during maximal grip test were significantly different (p < 0.05) as well. Specifically, muscle activities were lower by 12-15% after HV than NHV, indicating that HV might have influenced the ability to grip hardly. Inconclusion, maximal grip test and discomfort rating can be a predictive parameter to determine the instantaneous effects of handle vibration.

      • Age-Related Changes in Walking Motion of Japanese Females

        Irma,Nur,AFIAH,Hiroki,NAKASHIMA,Satoshi,MURAKI 대한인간공학회 2014 대한인간공학회 학술대회논문집 Vol.2014 No.5

        The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of aging on gait parameters at two different speed conditions in Japanese females. This study involved 42 healthy Japanese females who were divided into three groups: (1) 14 younger females, mean age 22.3 ± 1.6 years, (2) 14 older females (65 to 75 years old), mean age 70.7 ± 1.8 years, and (3) 14 very old females (≥ 76 years old), mean age 78.2 ± 3.5 years. Various parameters were measured: basic gait parameters (speed of walking, right step length, left step length, step length, difference between right and left step lengths, ratio of step length to height, ratio of step length to lower-limb length, and cadence) and gait cycle parameters (time of swing phase, time of stance phase, time of one gait cycle, percentage of swing phase, and percentage of stance phase). The walking speeds in groups 1, 2, and 3 were 72 ± 5.4, 71.4 ± 7.3, and 69.7 ± 6.7 at the self-selected speed, and 91.3 ± 7.4, 86.2 ± 8.3, and 85.1 ± 9.1 m/min at the fast speed, respectively. In two-way repeated-measure ANOVA, all the parameters showed statistically significant effects of speed conditions (p<0.05), except the difference between right and left step lengths. Statistically significant effects of groups were found in right step length, left step length, step length, and difference between right and left step lengths (p<0.05). In addition, significant interactions between speed conditions and groups were found in the time of swing phase, time of stance phase, and time of one gait cycle (p<0.05). Under the self-selected speed condition among the three groups, posthoc pairwise Bonferroni-corrected comparison showed significant differences in right step length, left step length, step length, and difference between right and left step lengths (p<0.05). Under the fast speed condition, however, significant differences were only found in right step length, left step length, and step length (p<0.05).

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